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  #1  
Old 04-05-2011, 12:30 AM
lightend lightend is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: london
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Default coining (wasnt sure where this would go)

ok, so i have engraved my die's and they are incredibly fine detail, they are made out of water hardened steel so should be fine.

I am planning on coining out of (sterling) silver so i thought a 50 ton press would be fine.
if you know anything about coining, can you take a look at this> http://www.alibaba.com/product-gs/31...ulic_Shop.html
and let me know if this will do what i want it to do. the 2 dies are 17mm in diameter (at the striking end, and 40mm at the other end).
the resulting silver coin will be 22mm x 2mm (i am a fan of number 2 haha although this wasn't intentional its just the way its gotta be)

Thank you in advance guys and girls
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  #2  
Old 04-05-2011, 01:08 PM
zota zota is offline
Steel
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ploiesti .Ro
Posts: 77
Default Re: coining (wasnt sure where this would go)

I did not trust such pressure because you can not have them cotrolul.Rather look for a manual screw press (if that depth are small details).Why I did not understand is how to beat a coin in a 22mm diameter 17mm diameter mold.I like everyone, I think, using blanks smaller diameter up to 1.5mm from the depths of engraving mold 2-2.5mm but using a friction press of 1500t.If you're a beginner asks for help from someone who has done that and not play with your health.A matrix is worse than a broken shell.Successful and hear only good things
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  #3  
Old 04-05-2011, 03:59 PM
Joe PAonessa Joe PAonessa is offline
Steel
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 80
Default Re: coining (wasnt sure where this would go)

That press would work, but its a bit of overkill for what you have. How many pieces are you going to strike? If just a few, buy a 2 kilo hammer and whack away. BTW, how about some pictures?

Joe Paonessa

Sometimes die cutter and occasional coin maker.
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  #4  
Old 04-11-2011, 08:23 AM
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Roger Bleile Roger Bleile is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 1,678
Default Re: coining (wasnt sure where this would go)

Joe,

I have been interested in coining silver bracelets by engraving a die for one rather than engraving them one at a time. I realize that it would require a very substantial press to strike something as big as a piece of silver 3/4"x 6"x1/8". Rather than buying a press, is it possible to go to a die shop, have them make an unhardened die block that I would engrave then have them harden it and strike the bracelets that I would finish and bend?

Thanks,

Roger
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  #5  
Old 04-14-2011, 02:22 PM
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Postelwijn Postelwijn is offline
Steel
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: 's-Hertogenbosch
Posts: 14
Default Re: coining (wasnt sure where this would go)

A fifty ton press should suffice for a small coin of 22 mm. Silver is a rather soft metal, especially sterling silver or even better; pure silver. But the result depends on other things as well, e.g. the depth of the engraving in the dies. Compare a coin with a high relief medal. A high relief medal takes a much heavier press than a flat coin.
Are you going to struck your coin with the aid of a ring or without? That also makes a difference for the result.
I'd love to see some pictures of your coin dies.

Regards,
Lei
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  #6  
Old 04-14-2011, 02:43 PM
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Postelwijn Postelwijn is offline
Steel
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: 's-Hertogenbosch
Posts: 14
Default Re: coining (wasnt sure where this would go)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Bleile View Post
Joe,

I have been interested in coining silver bracelets by engraving a die for one rather than engraving them one at a time. I realize that it would require a very substantial press to strike something as big as a piece of silver 3/4"x 6"x1/8". Rather than buying a press, is it possible to go to a die shop, have them make an unhardened die block that I would engrave then have them harden it and strike the bracelets that I would finish and bend?

Thanks,

Roger
Hello Roger,

In my opinion your plan should work perfectly. You need to find a company that has a large press that is used for e.g. cutlery or big medals. Than you could discuss the preconditions and technical details of the die you want to make. In many cases such a company has employees that make the necessary tools.

Let them prepare the steel block that you are going to engrave. If the engraving is ready they also should take care of hardening the steel. Especially when the die is used on their press it is better to let them choose the steel (tool steel comes in all kinds of different alloys) and do the hardening. It is safer.

Regards,
Lei
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  #7  
Old 04-14-2011, 03:49 PM
Joe PAonessa Joe PAonessa is offline
Steel
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 80
Default Re: coining (wasnt sure where this would go)

Roger,

You may not need to use a large press if you strike it bit by bit. Steve Adams has made plate dies much larger than what you are considering and used a hammer to strike aluminum into the die. I know this is an explanation in a nutshell, but basically, the aluminum was taped and clamped over the die, a soft face plastic hammer was used to seat the metal and then a ball peen hammer was used to finish the job. It leaves a hammered finish on the reverse, but that can be fixed. He let me try it on a 6 inch square carousel horse die he has and it does work. I think you could adapt this method to what you want to do and you might not even need to harden the die, depending on how many pieces you planned on making.

Lei, You live in s'Hertogenbosch? I was stationed at Soesterberg Air Base and lived in Woerden and Utrecht back in the 80's. Lovely country, I miss Hertog Jan beer and Dowe Egbert's coffee.

Tot Ziens, Ya'll

Joe Paonessa
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  #8  
Old 04-14-2011, 04:02 PM
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Postelwijn Postelwijn is offline
Steel
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: 's-Hertogenbosch
Posts: 14
Default Re: coining (wasnt sure where this would go)

Hi Joe,

Yep, 's-Hertogenbosch is the place were I live. Great that you know my country that well. Both coffee and beer brands still exist. Perhaps a reason to visit the Netherlands again?

Lei
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  #9  
Old 04-14-2011, 06:07 PM
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Roger Bleile Roger Bleile is offline
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Default Re: coining (wasnt sure where this would go)

Thanks for the responses gentlemen
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http://www.engravingglossary.com/
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